E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

All things related to the Centroid Acorn CNC Controller

Moderator: cnckeith

Post Reply
greglwood
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2021 10:03 pm
Acorn CNC Controller: Yes
Allin1DC CNC Controller: No
Oak CNC controller: No
MPU11 & GPIO4D -w/ 3rd Party Drives: No
DC3IOB: No
CNC12: Yes
CNC11: No
CPU10 or CPU7: No
CNC Control System Serial Number: none

E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

Post by greglwood »

Update: I found my answer in the pamphlet/book that came with the either1616. Short answer there is a much larger (by multiples) delay on the either1616. It suggests not putting homing/e-stop/probling, etc on it.

I am leaving this post for the benefits of others who SEARCH for an answer.

I tried searching for this but did not find anything. I was wondering if putting the E-Stop on the either1616 should be avoided? Wiring would be made much simpler if a mini sub control box that has only the either1616 in it was used. Then put the acorn board/drivers/drive power supplies, etc in a main control box. All wiring for homes, limits, ATC's and coolant could/would be connected right at the mill. Only a eithernet cable to the acorn control box. Stepper wiring would go to the main control box but nice heavy duty cables/extension cables can be purchased readily for that. It's all the different tiny wires for everything else thats problematic for me since I am going to have to locate my main control box a few feet from the mill.

Thanks
Greg
greglwood
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2021 10:03 pm
Acorn CNC Controller: Yes
Allin1DC CNC Controller: No
Oak CNC controller: No
MPU11 & GPIO4D -w/ 3rd Party Drives: No
DC3IOB: No
CNC12: Yes
CNC11: No
CPU10 or CPU7: No
CNC Control System Serial Number: none

Re: E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

Post by greglwood »

My alternative approach would be to bring everything into a db25 breakout, run to the main control box and use another db25 breakout to break them back out. I might only need a db15 but still determining what all is needed. NOTE I am not talking about using the db25 on the acorn. For now it's my intend to use home and limit switches on all axis independently. I currently have them temporarily wired to one input but do not wish to leave things that way.

Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Gary Campbell
Posts: 1669
Joined: Sat Nov 18, 2017 2:32 pm
Acorn CNC Controller: Yes
Allin1DC CNC Controller: No
Oak CNC controller: No
MPU11 & GPIO4D -w/ 3rd Party Drives: No
DC3IOB: No
CNC12: Yes
CNC11: No
CPU10 or CPU7: No
CNC Control System Serial Number: Acorn 238
Location: Marquette, MI
Contact:

Re: E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

Post by Gary Campbell »

Suggestion:
Use the Acorn inputs for homing and estop (IP8) functions. Use ETH1616 for any others

EDIT: Acorn EXPECTS that ESTOP will be on IP8
GCnC Control
CNC Control & Retrofits
https://www.youtube.com/user/Islaww1/videos
martyscncgarage
Posts: 9140
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:01 pm
Acorn CNC Controller: Yes
Allin1DC CNC Controller: Yes
Oak CNC controller: No
MPU11 & GPIO4D -w/ 3rd Party Drives: No
DC3IOB: No
CNC12: Yes
CNC11: Yes
CPU10 or CPU7: Yes
CNC Control System Serial Number: none
Location: Mesa, AZ

Re: E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

Post by martyscncgarage »

The Ether1616 manual says not to put critical inputs on Ether1616
https://www.centroidcnc.com/centroid_di ... _guide.pdf
Page 24
Reminder, for support please follow this post: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=383
We can't "SEE" what you see...
Mesa, AZ
greglwood
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2021 10:03 pm
Acorn CNC Controller: Yes
Allin1DC CNC Controller: No
Oak CNC controller: No
MPU11 & GPIO4D -w/ 3rd Party Drives: No
DC3IOB: No
CNC12: Yes
CNC11: No
CPU10 or CPU7: No
CNC Control System Serial Number: none

Re: E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

Post by greglwood »

I am beginning to see why home all and limit all are so popular. If one has a 4 axis machine there is not enough inputs for home/limit with e-stop on all. Since I have a probe as well I had decided to go back and leave things with homeall and limitall. Then I call up the ETHER1616, TYPICAL CONNECTIONS diagram and lo and behold it shows the home and limit switches hooked to it for each of 3 axis'. So it seems the documentation seems to contradict itself. I'm going to leave things as homeall and limitall probably using one input for home and one for limit if software allows it, but maybe some clarification on the documentation is in order.

Greg
martyscncgarage
Posts: 9140
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:01 pm
Acorn CNC Controller: Yes
Allin1DC CNC Controller: Yes
Oak CNC controller: No
MPU11 & GPIO4D -w/ 3rd Party Drives: No
DC3IOB: No
CNC12: Yes
CNC11: Yes
CPU10 or CPU7: Yes
CNC Control System Serial Number: none
Location: Mesa, AZ

Re: E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

Post by martyscncgarage »

It's not an issue to connect home limit switches to ether1616. See page 13 of the Ether1616 manual.
Reminder, for support please follow this post: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=383
We can't "SEE" what you see...
Mesa, AZ
Richards
Posts: 615
Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2018 9:01 pm
Acorn CNC Controller: Yes
Allin1DC CNC Controller: No
Oak CNC controller: No
MPU11 & GPIO4D -w/ 3rd Party Drives: No
DC3IOB: No
CNC12: Yes
CNC11: No
CPU10 or CPU7: No
CNC Control System Serial Number: none
Location: South Jordan, UT

Re: E-Stop on Ether1616/Delay

Post by Richards »

Given the fact that the 16X16 board can take 100 msecs to sense an input, whether on not you can use that board to detect home or limits depends a lot on where and how you use homing sensors and limit sensors. For instance, if your mill or lathe has fast jog times of 200 inches per minute, it will jog 3.33 inches per second. It will jog 0.33 inches in 100 msecs. If your limit switch is at least 0.5 inches away from a hard stop, you could safely use the 16X16 board to detect limits. Homing is normally performed at low speeds, maybe 10 inches per minute. At that speed, the axis would only travel about 0.01667 inches in 100 msecs, and with homing, you can specify how far the home sensor detection point is from true home. My greatest concern would be repeatability. If the delay between sensing a switch or sensor is consistent, then the 16X16 board would be usable as long as you position your switches/sensors to allow for the delays. If the delay is not consistent, then the results would not be consistent. If the results were 20% inconsistent when homing at 10 inches per second, then the detected home position could be off as much as 0.003 inch. If that is too much, then you could always run a second or third homing routine using progressively slower speeds.

I've experimented a little with the Acorn, the Acorn with a 16X16 board, the Acorn with an Automation Direct P1000 PLC, and the Acorn with a 16X16 board and with an AutomationDirect P1000 PLC. The P1000 PLC has sub-millisecond scan times, so it works very well when combining multiple signals into one signal, i.e., servo faults, homing, or limits. Because it does not communicate directly with the Acorn, the system is still limited to the Acorn's 8-outputs that are directly controlled by the program. The P1000 costs $250 - $350 depending on the number of I/O modules that you add to the CPU unit. Using the PLC with the Acorn and with a 16X16 board allows for fast sensing of inputs and at least twenty-four outputs; however, I can't think of how an Acorn class controller would require using those three items together. I've toyed with the idea of building a two cabinet controller where one cabinet contained the Acorn along with basic circuitry and the second cabinet contained a 16X16 board, a P1000 PLC, and a VFD along with the required circuitry used with those items. That would minimize the problem of electrical noise created by a VFD, but, doing something like that is like having a solution and then looking for the problem.

Usually there is a work-around for almost any situation. The Acorn by itself outperforms any other inexpensive single-board controller that I've ever used. Adding a 16X16 board greatly enhances its usefulness. Tweaking the g-code to compensate for timing problems might be a logical work-around.
-Mike Richards
Post Reply